Other attestations:

GIACOMO LAURI-VOLPI, VOCI PARALLELE, GARZANTI, MILAN 1955, P. 159.(...)

His clear, agile voice gives Prandelli the privilege of singing operas with true style, unaffected by the excesses to which second-rate interpreters often stoop. Composure and dignity are the outstanding features of this noble singer, elegantand self-possessed on stage.

 

ANGELO SGUERZI, LE STIRPI CANORE, EDIZIONI BONGIOVANNI, BOLOGNA 1978, PP.163-164.(...)

It was not so much unlimited power or range or particular density of tone that brought him renown as first-rate musicality, with superb phrasing that was unbeatable in terms of variety of expression and clear diction, always agile, rhythmicaland virtually infallible. Not for nothing did he win the approval of that unbending conductor that was Arturo Toscanini; he was even appreciated by German conductors such as Wilhelm Furtwaengler. This is why he performed repeatedly atthe best theatres and why the great sopranos – from Favero to Tebaldi, from Caniglia to Simionato – were all eager to be his partner (…).

 

BRUNO BAUDISSONE, UN NIDO DI MEMORIE – INTERVISTE A 40 CANTANTI LIRICI, EDIZIONI MUSICALI SCOMEGNA, LA LOGGIA, TURIN 1983, P. 105.

You have had the fortune to be directed by Toscanini – how do you remember such a talked-of man? “I am probably the only tenor who sang with Toscanini after his return from America. In 1946 I performed Beethoven’s Ninth with him, in the concert held to mark the reconstruction of La Scala; in 1948 I performed the prison scene from Mephistopheles to commemorate Boito, and in 1950-51, as I have already said, I sang in Verdi’s Requiem, again at La Scala. I had heard talk about the Maestro’s severity and intransigence since I was a young lad. I never once received a rebuke from him, maybe because I knew the music well. Toscanini was always very gracious with me. Before the performance, he even used to come to the dressing-room to wish the singers good luck – and he found it tiring to climb the few steps. That was something that not even much less important conductors than him bothered to do.”

 

LETTER FROM FRANCESCO CILEA TO PIERO OSTALI, VARAZZE, 9th JUNE 1949, IN FRANCESCO CILEA, BY DOMENICO FERRARO – NANDI OSTALI – PIERO OSTALI JR., CASA MUSICALE SONZOGNO DI PIERO OSTALI, MILAN 2000, PP. 481-482. (...)

I am very grateful to lawyer Gallino for having informed you promptly of the huge success of Adriana at the Carlo Felice. (…) Here is my brief impression of the artists. Gavazzeni slow in the tempos; Favero, rather tired in the voice; Simionato very good and polished, as was the likeable Mariano Caruso in the role of the village priest; excellent Prandelli for his fine figure, elegance and action. At the present time he is the best Maurizio due to these qualities, and we should propose him for the Opera in Rome. I also think he would make a good and effective Federico in Arlesiana.